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Archive for the ‘Office 365’ Category

SPC11 Keynote: Online Focus, Delivering Productivity and Next Year: Las Vegas!

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The SharePoint Conference 2011 has just kicked off in Anaheim. Succeeding Steve Ballmer as the main keynote speaker is not an easy task but Jared Spataro gave a good performance in his own more relaxed style (hardly any shouting and sweating in sight).

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The theme of the conference is Productivity Delivered which relates directly to the fact that this conference is not held in a launch year, rather focus is on getting the most out of the existing product and maximising what can be done within the boundaries of SharePoint 2010.

Jared showed a short video about how the SharePoint team had been looking (in vain) for a Hollywood spokesperson for SharePoint. The video did put smiles on peoples faces and featured, among others, Luke Perry and Carmen Electra:

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Stats

You gotta have stats at a keynote. And Jared showed the following:

  • SharePoint is now one of the biggest products at Microsoft. The product continues to grow with double digits.
  • Microsoft has sold 125 million licenses of SharePoint to 65,000 customers.
  • 67% of enterprise customers have rolled out SharePoint to everyone in their organisations.
  • Office 365 now serves millions of customers (no exact numbers).
  • The conference is attended by more than 7,500 people. 240 breakout sessions are planned and 200 partners are present in the exhibit hall.

 

Jeff Teper

Jared handed over to Jeff Teper, the senior vice president of MS Office (and the father of SharePoint), and a huge SharePoint nerd; he really loves his product and the development community.

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Some of Jeff’s key points:

  • The biggest growth area of SharePoint is within public facing sites (www and extranet) – it has seen a hockey stick-like growth of 25-30% during the past year.
  • This has been the busiest year ever for the SharePoint team at Microsoft.
  • No other collaboration software can be setup and running as fast as Office 365.
  • Microsoft are working on the next major release of SharePoint but nothing will be shown this week.
  • Worldwide more than 700,000 developers work with SharePoint.
  • 1,162 books are available about SharePoint at Amazon.
  • Office 365 will get a major update towards the end of the year. Among other things, BCS will be enabled and so will read/write access to web services.
  • Microsoft is releasing a new, advanced certification, i.e. the Certified Architects Program. This will be the most advanced SharePoint certification to date.

Jeff surrendered the stage to Richard Riley for a rather impressive on-stage demo of how well SharePoint 2010 scales and fails over event with several terabytes of data. By the way, Microsoft has released an update to the SharePoint Capacity Planning Guide.

 

Kurt Delbene

Kurt, the president of MS Office division, gave a speak centered around Office 365 and cloud services.

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  • Office 365 is all about scalability. Even small companies are adopting the software on a large scale.
  • 80% of the smaller companies that use Office 365 have never rolled out SharePoint themselves.
  • Office 365 is backed by Microsoft which means it’s secure, reliable and fully supported by MS.
  • A few interesting industry facts:
    • 84% of organisations have a remote workforce.
    • 65% of all companies are deploying at least one social software tool.
    • 70% of IT budgets are spent maintaining inflexible and siloed data centre solutions.
    • 80% of larger enterprise IT managers are at least in trial stage for cloud computing initiatives.

Microsoft are donating $50,000 to a good cause through Net Hope. Attendees at SPC11 will decide which organisation should receive the sum and of course MS has created a web app to handle the voting (available through MySPC at the conference web site). We were given a quick tour behind the stage of the application which is based on Windows Azure, SQL Azure, SharePoint Online, HTML5, REST and JSON. Neat.

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And another thing: Vegas 2012 baby!

Jared concluded with a Steve Jobs-style “And another thing”-announcement: The next SharePoint Conference will be held at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas on 12-15 November 2012!

Let’s go!

As expected, there were no major announcements during the keynote but what the conference may lack in sexy new product launches it certainly will make up for in usefulness. Tons of great sessions and hands-on labs are there to attend and peruse.

Written by Thomas Sondergaard

October 3, 2011 at 5:34 pm

Quick Fix: Remove Libraries, Lists From ToC

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I usually strive to first and foremost use SharePoint’s out of the box functionality to fulfil clients’ needs. Custom solutions with managed code, controlled deployment etc. are all well and good but sometimes you can get by with some simple frontend-configuration. This approach, if done right, enables clients to easier maintain and further enhance their SharePoint site once it’s up and running and the expensive SharePoint consultants have left the building.

Small adjustments can often be done with CSS or JavaScript/jQuery without remote desktop access to the server park. I know some hard core devs out there will oppose to making more or less unmanaged changes using something that hasn’t been pushed through a compiler. But like it or not, we need to get used to working within the constraints of Office 365 and SharePoint in the cloud. More about that in a later article.

Anyway, let’s skip the politics and get to the point of this post.

 

The problem

When you insert a standard Table of Contents web part it looks something like this:

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And if you’re like most of my clients, you want it to look like this:

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I.e. more “site mappy” without links to lists, document libraries and discussions.

 

The solution

This is the quick fix and therefore we’ll use client-side JavaScript to hide the unwanted nodes in the ToC.

First, create a library in the site to hold custom scripts. Why not call it “scripts”?

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For easy editing, open the the new library in explorer view and create a text file, like so:

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Open the text file in your favourite editor and paste the following JavaScript:

   1: <script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript">

   2: // This script removes lists, libraries and discussions from Table of Contents

   3: // PeopleNet, tso@peoplenet.dk

   4: var links = document.body.getElementsByTagName("a");

   5: for(ii=0; ii<links.length; ii++)

   6: {

   7:     if(links[ii].outerHTML.indexOf("BaseType") != -1 && 

   8:       links[ii].parentNode.parentNode.parentNode.parentNode.className == "level-section")

   9:     {

  10:         links[ii].parentNode.parentNode.parentNode.parentNode.style.display = "none";

  11:     }

  12: }

  13: </script>

 

Save the file and go back to the SharePoint page where you placed the ToC web part. Below the ToC insert a Content Editor Web Part.

Back in the old days (i.e. SharePoint 2007) you’d edit JavaScript directly in the web part. This is still possible but it’s really quirky to work with. Instead, in the web part’s properties, point to the text file you created earlier:

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This approach makes it so much easier to edit the JavaScript in a proper editor instead of in a SharePoint pop-up.

Click OK and save the page. The unwanted nodes are now hidden.

 

Note

I’m fully aware of the implications of the above approach with regards to solution management, client-side performance and so on, but every solution needs to be seen in the context of the need it fulfils. And sometimes the above approach hits the mark.

And remember, the Table of Contents web part is just one of site navigation options in SharePoint.

Written by Thomas Sondergaard

September 27, 2011 at 10:44 pm